A Criminal Defense Attorney in Auburn Represents Clients Charged with Felony Vandalism

A person who has been charged with misdemeanor vandalism needs representation from a criminal defense attorney in Auburn. That need for professional legal assistance becomes even more important for someone charged with felony vandalism. What circumstances result in the more serious type of charges?

Criminal Mischief

In Indiana, the legal term for vandalism is ‘criminal mischief’. That term might make the act sound trivial, but in reality, the consequences can be severe. A conviction can result in a hefty monetary penalty and even a prison sentence.


The actions can be seemingly minor, such as scratching initials onto a bathroom wall in a tavern. In contrast, the vandalism may have caused substantial damage, such as when a person spray-paints graffiti on a building or a backyard fence, or torches a vehicle. Criminal mischief is broadly defined as damaging, defacing or destroying someone else’s property.

Types of Vandalism Felony Charges

In Indiana, causing at least $250 worth of damage in an act of vandalism is a felony. The person who thought they were just having some relatively harmless fun with a paint can, a key or a rock may be shocked to discover that a conviction can mean a sentence of up to 3 years in prison.

The charge escalates when the damage amount reaches higher than $2,500, changing from a class D to a class C felony. Now the client of a criminal defense attorney in Auburn is at risk of being sentenced to 10 years in prison. Judges are likely to be harsh instead of lenient if the vandalism was done to a place of worship or a school.

How Lawyers Can Help

Aggressive representation by lawyers with an organization such as Yoder & Kraus, attorneys at law, is imperative to avoid a long prison sentence that can ruin the person’s life. If a plea bargain appears to be the best strategy, the attorney will negotiate with the prosecution for a reasonable agreement. For instance, a class D felony might be converted to a misdemeanor. This can result in a significantly lower jail sentence and fine, or even a sentence of probation instead of incarceration. Like us on Facebook.

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